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Armillary Sphere

Model to show celestial sphere; larger version has capacity to show lunar motions.

What it shows:

The position and motions of heavenly bodies are projected against a hypothetical sphere of infinite radius, centered on the Earth, called the Celestial Sphere. With this demo you can explain the motions of the stars and of the Sun, and show various aspects of the seasons.

How it works:

The main features of the sphere itself are shown schematically in figure 1. The spherical wire cage defines the celestial sphere, its...

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Thermocouple Brownie

A brownie pan with two food safe thermocouples, one in the brownie batter and one in the air next to the pan, is put in a pre-heated oven, and the temperature profiles recorded and displayed.

Clean copper wire is used to make an armature for the thermcouple wires. Crimp the center of a 20 cm piece of 14 ga wire on the side of the baking pan. Bend loops at the ends of the copper wire to hold the thermocouple wire.

The oven temperature thermocouple should be about five centimeters away from the pan, at the same level as the center of the pan. The brownie thermocouple is...

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Leaning Ladder

Small ladder against wall with variable load and inclination.

What it shows: 

A small ladder is leaned against a vertical wall. A weight can be moved up succeeding steps to find when the ladder will slip and fall down. The forces holding the ladder in equilibrium are in consideration here.

How it works: 

A short (4 foot) step-ladder leans against the wall. The reaction of the wall may be considered horizontal, tangential friction being negligible (the edge of the ladder is covered with a sheet of...

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Double Atwood's Machine

Prediction of motion of masses in a more complex pulley/mass assembly.

double atwoods machine

What it shows:  This compund Atwood's Machine demonstrates an old and interesting problem. The two small weights on the right side are not of equal mass — one is 100 g and the other...

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Spiral Fracture

What it shows:

A spiral fracture is incurred when a torque is directed along the axis of a limb or shaft. Planes perpendicular to the axis are unaffected, but those parallel are twisted, which causes pure tensile forces in one part of the limb, pure compressive forces in another. Fracture occurs when either the compressive or tensile limit of the material is exceeded. This demo shows a spiral fracture in a simulated skiing accident.

How it works:

An old ski boot has a wooden plug placed snugly inside it acting as a foot. A 3 × 4cm square hole accommodates a 0.5m...

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Organ Pipes

Selection of single organ pipes, open and close-ended, to blow through.

organ pipes

Conductivity of Water

What it shows:

Pure water is an electrical insulator. But provide an ionic compound in the form of salt, and you complete the circuit.

How it works:

A simple circuit with the mains supply connected to a 15W light bulb and two copper sheet electrodes (figure 1). The electrodes are placed in a 1500ml beaker containing distilled water. Distilled water is a very good insulator, with an autoionisation of 1:10-7 (the proportion of molecules in H3O+ + OH- form) it has a resistance of...

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Skin Depth

What it shows:

The depth to which electromagnetic radiation can penetrate a conducting surface decreases as the conductivity and the oscillation frequency increase. This demo compares the skin depth of AM and FM radio frequencies, and shows just how small these distances are.

How it works:

An electromagnetic wave entering a conducting surface is damped and reduces in amplitude by a factor 1/e in a distance ∂ given by 1

...

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